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Leadership Tips When Going through Change

December 8, 2016

Change before you have to. The external world always demands change and improvement. Beat the market. Create internal mechanisms that force you to make changes long before you have to.

A strong leader is always thinking ahead – anticipating – ready with solutions when problems arise. S/he has a finger on the pulse of staff and customers alike and uses that information to grow the department/company.

Here are 2 leadership strategies I include in my coaching sessions with managers and entrepreneurs. They’ll help you reach your potential, too.

Strategy 1: Effective leaders master their time

Effective leaders are relentless about clearing items off their to do list. What’s more, it helps them control their time. They know what is important and make decisions that are logical.

Once a focused leader decides that what is in front of him/her is important, they will focus and deal with it. If it takes 90 minutes instead of the scheduled 60 minutes, then so be it.

This habit can be frustrating to others, but it makes a major difference in a leader’s effectiveness. Critical conversations and transactions are consistently brought to closure. Result? Fewer matters remain unresolved and leaders are free to focus their attention elsewhere.

Strategy 2: Smart leaders build bench strength

In baseball, managers often talk about their “bench strength” – their ability to call on any of several talented players throughout a game. Without bench strength, your company can’t grow. When you have great players on your team, you have the freedom to make critical decisions that will ensure your company’s growth.

Develop great bench strength by sticking to two simple rules:

**Insist that every supervisor have his/her own replacement trained and ready to move up.

These strategies will strengthen your abilities as a manager, increase productivity within your department/company, and show others your true leadership qualities. Start applying them now and watch performance soar!

To add value to others, one must first value others.” –John Maxwell

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